Digital Evidence Database

Showing 11 to 20 of 120 results.
  • La Preuve Audiovisuelle Devant Les Instances Internationales: techniques et Admissibilité, Manuel à l'usage des practiciens

    Institution

    TRIAL

    Language

    French

    Publication date
    2020-12-01

    Reference link
    https://trialinternational.org/fr/latest-post/la-preuve-audiovisuelle-devant-les-instances-internationales-nouveau-manuel-a-lusage-des-praticiens/
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    The manual promotes the use of the new technologies in the daily work of human rights defenders, lawyers, prosecutors, and other professional involved in international justice. It also aims to advance practices at the national level regarding the usage of audiovisual material as evidence.
    Description
    The manual is the result of a project started by the organization in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on the use of new technologies in the fight against impunity regarding international crimes, and more specifically, on the use of audiovisual material as evidence. The manual is structured in two chapters. Chapter 1 addresses the admissibility and evidentiary weight of audiovisual evidence; and, Chapter 2 addresses audiovisual means and techniques regarding testimonies in international criminal proceedings, as well as witness protection. The manual provides an overview of relevant jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals on the use of audiovisual material as evidence.
    Target group
    (international) criminal justice practitioners, including human rights defenders, lawyers, prosecutors

  • ACPO Good Practice Guide for Computer based Electronic Evidence

    Institution

    Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO)

    Language

    English

    Publication date
    2003-10-01

    Reference link
    https://cryptome.org/acpo-guide.htm
    Purpose
    "Details in this guide are designed to ensure good practice when collecting computer based electronic evidence; guidelines are not intended for use when dealing with evidence produced by witnesses from third party computer systems."
    Description
    The guide is not intended as a definitive manual of every operation during the investigation of a high tech crime or recovery of computer based electronic evidence. It provides guidance on the most common circumstances when computer-based and mobile phones evidence is involved. The document includes the principles of computer-based electronic evidence, guidance concerning the handling, retrieval and transport. It also sets out practices concerning the investigating personnel, interviews, retention, storage, evidence recovery and disclosure. Lastly, it addresses on welfare and health and safety considerations. The document also includes a glossary.
    Target group
    Personnel attending crime scenes or making initial contact with a victim; Investigators; Evidence recovery staff; External consulting witnesses

  • ACPO Good Practice Guide for Digital Evidence

    Institution

    Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO)

    Language

    English

    Publication date
    2012-03-01

    Reference link
    https://www.digital-detective.net/digital-forensics-documents/ACPO_Good_Practice_Guide_for_Digital_Evidence_v5.pdf
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to assist law enforcement and all others that assist in investigating cyber security incidents and crime.
    Description
    This document provides an overview of computer based electronic investigations, with emphasis on the types of crimes scenes, types of networks and technology and how to perform network forensics. The guide includes principles of digital evidence and their explanation, location of digital evidence, seizure of electronic evidence, proportionality issues relating to seizure, preparation before and after capturing digital evidence, analyses of seized digital evidence, interpretation of digital data, communication of digital evidence, verbal feedback, how to make statements or reports on digital evidence, witness evidence, training and education of digital evidence, welfare of staff working on digital evidence and disclosure.
    Target group
    UK law enforcement personnel who may deal with digital evidence. This will include: - Persons who are involved in the securing, seizing and transporting of equipment from search scenes with a view to recovering digital evidence, as well as in the identification of the digital information needed to investigate crime; - Investigators who plan and manage the identification, presentation and storage of digital evidence, and the use of that evidence; - Persons who recover and reproduce seized digital evidence and are trained to carry out the function and have relevant training to give evidence in court of their actions. - Persons who are involved in the selection and management of persons who may be required to assist in the recovery, identification and interpretation of digital evidence.

  • Good Practice Guide for Computer-Based Electronic Evidence

    Institution

    7Safe (Part of PA Consulting)

    Language

    English

    Reference link
    https://www.7safe.com/docs/default-source/default-document-library/acpo_guidelines_computer_evidence_v4_web.pdf
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    This good practice guide is intended for use in the recovery of computer-based electronic evidence. However, it is not a comprehensive guide to the examination of that evidence. The guide suggests methods that will help preserve the integrity of such evidences. The advice is formulated to assist staff in dealing with allegations of crime which involve a high-tech element and to ensure they collect all relevant evidence in a timely and appropriate manner.
    Description
    The guide contains principles of computer-based electronic evidence; guidelines on seizure of evidence; storage after seizure, home networks and wireless techonology, such as types of wired and wireless devices; network forensics and volatile data; tools to obtain discrete information; investigating personnel; evidence recovery; welfare in the work place; control of peadophile images; external consulting witnesses and forensic contractors; disclosure; retrieval of video and CCTV evidence; and guide for mobile phone seizure and examination.
    Target group
    Personnel attending crime scenes or making initial contact with a victim/witness/suspect, investigators, evidence recovery staff, external consulting witnesses

  • Global Guidelines for Digital Forensics Laboratories

    Institution

    International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) (Global Complex for Innovation)

    Language

    English

    Publication date
    2019-05-13

    Reference link
    https://www.interpol.int/content/download/13501/file/INTERPOL_DFL_GlobalGuidelinesDigitalForensicsLaboratory.pdf
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    The purpose of this guideline is to outline the procedures for establishing and managing a Digital Forensics Laboratory (DFL) and provide technical guidelines for managing and processing electronic evidence. These guidelines should be used as a template by countries considering developing their digital forensics capability. The advice given is intended to be used at both the strategic and tactical levels, in accordance with national legislation, practice, and procedures. Additionally, it aims to ensure that electronic evidence produced by the DFL is admissible in member countries’ courts of law as well as in the international criminal justice systems.
    Description
    The document includes facts and principles on electronic evidence, management of a digital forensic laboratory with description of roles and responsibilites of staff, case management procedures, laboratory analysis procedure; criteria for the admissibility of electronic evidence; accreditation for Interpol's Innovation Centre’s Digital Forensics Lab (DFL).
    Target group
    INTERPOL member countries (digital forensics strategists and managers and technical staff)

  • Using the Internet and Social Media for Counter-Terrorism Investigations

    Institution

    United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre (UNCCT)

    Publication date
    2019-07-11

    Reference link
    https://www.interpol.int/en/News-and-Events/News/2019/INTERPOL-and-UN-publish-joint-handbook-for-online-counter-terrorism-investigations
    Purpose
    Help investigators collect, analyse and share information found online, particularly on social media platforms.
    Description
    The handbook shares good practices and offers practical online tools to assist investigators in Understanding how terrorists have adapted the way they use the Internet and social media and continue to be active online; Good practices in conducting an online counter-terrorism investigation; Steps for requesting the preservation and collection of electronic evidence, including from service providers. NB: The handbook is not open-access, in order to receive a copy of the handbook, law enforcement officers should contact the INTERPOL National Central Bureau in their country.
    Target group
    Investigators and law enforcement officers

  • Geospatial Evidence in International Human Rights Litigation: Technical and Legal considerations.

    Institution

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

    Language

    English

    Reference link
    https://www.aaas.org/resources/geospatial-evidence-international-human-rights-litigation-technical-and-legal
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    This report is intended to provide a starting point for human rights NGOs and advocates who are considering using geospatial technologies in their human rights and ICL documentation efforts, as well as recommendations to ensure the most rigourous scientific methods and robust analysis to guide the admission of this evidence in court. The document draws from the AAAS's experience to provide recommendations to properly assess and weigh sound geospatial evidence.
    Description
    The report addresses the relevance and use of geospatial evidence for the documentation of human rights evidence, procedures for image acquisition and analysis, human rights cases in which the international courts have relied on geospatial evidence, and the standards they used to evaluate the evidence. It further contains standards for the use of geospatial technologies and human rights and international criminal law (ICL)evidence, particularly at the International Criminal court (ICC) and other ICL tribunals, Moreover, it includes an discusses admissiion and evaluation of geospatial evidence at the ICC.
    Target group
    Human rights professionals, lawyers, prosecutors and judicial institutions

  • The New Forensics Using Open Source Information to investigate Grave Crimes

    Institution

    Berkeley Centre for Human Rights

    Language

    English

    Publication date
    2018-07-01

    Reference link
    https://www.law.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Bellagio_report_2018_7.pdf
    Purpose
    The document aims toprovide guidance for potential legal standards for open source investigations intended for use in legal procedings; identifying the principles that should underlie the development of legal standards; and, determining how best to mature this field of practice.
    Description
    The document highlights the discussion, conclusions, and recommendations from the workshop on evidence collection and legal accountability that the Human Rights Center hosted in Bellagio, Italy, from 2–6 October 2017. It addresses how online open source investigations can be strengthened to improve investigations and prosecutions by uncovering critical evidence of serious international crimes. It provides definitions, some standards and principles on open source investigation.
    Target group
    NGO investigators, international and national tribunal investigators, prosecutors, judges, defence attorneys, journalists, and academics

  • Beyond Reasonable Doubt Using Scientific Evidence to Advance Prosecutions at the International Criminal Court

    Institution

    Berkeley Centre for Human Rights

    Language

    English

    Publication date
    2012-10-01

    Reference link
    https://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/HRC/HRC_Beyond_Reasonable_Doubt_FINAL.pdf
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    The purpose of the document is to promote ideas, expertise, strategies, and strategic and technological resources for investigators and prosecutors for the applicatio of new and emerging scientific methods and technologies to pursue accountability.
    Description
    The report presents recommendations drawn from the workshop convened by the Berkeley HRC in consultation with the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court in October 2012. The report includes a major section on the background of the issue, presenting an overview on the use of scientific evidence at international criminal tribunals (ICC, ICTY, ICTR and ECCC). The document includes best practices as discussed in the workshop, concerning evidence collection, preservation and analysis, and presentation of evidence in the courtroom. Lastly, the report sets out precise conclusions and recommendations regarding documentary evidence, and information technologies and management.
    Target group
    Investigators and prosecutors

  • Digital Fingerprints Using Electronic Evidence to Advance Prosecutions at the International Criminal Court

    Institution

    Berkeley Centre for Human Rights

    Language

    English

    Publication date
    2014-02-01

    Reference link
    https://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/HRC/Digital_fingerprints_interior_cover2.pdf
    Executive summary
    n/a
    Purpose
    The document aims to promote an open exchange of ideas and expertise on strategies to improve the capacity of investigators and prosecutors to gather and analyze digital evidence relevant to serious international crimes.
    Description
    The report presents recommendations drawn from the workshop convened by the Berkeley HRC in collaboration with CITRIS in Salzburg, Austria, in October 2013. The report includes a background section, presenting an overview on digital evidence at the International Criminal Court (ICC), its history and in trial proceedings. The document addresses issues such as the relevance of building the ICC's internal capacity, and fostering external partnerships. Lastly, the report sets out precise recommendations in this line.
    Target group
    Investigators and prosecutors

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